Author Topic: Book of Jeremiah 10:2  (Read 6572 times)

the deadly 7

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Book of Jeremiah 10:2
« on: October 12, 2009, 03:40:02 PM »
Book of Jeremiah 10:2
Thus says the LORD, "Do not learn the way of the nations . . .

The original Hebrew word for way is jrd.

according to searchgodsword.org:

'way' can mean:

1. road, way, path
2. journey
3. direction
4. manner, habit, way
5. of course of life (fig.)
6. of moral character (fig.)

My New American Catholic Bible translates jrd into customs:

What is the Christian Bible equivalent for 'way'?

Matt 7:13 (Jesus said)
"Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it."

The original Greek word for way is hodos.

according to searchgodsword.org:

way can mean:

1. properly
1. a way
1. a travelled way, road
2. a travellers way, journey, travelling
2. metaph.
1. a course of conduct
2. a way (i.e. manner) of thinking, feeling, deciding


Even though Jer. 10:1-4 no doubt had an application to the customs practiced some 2600 years ago, we must keep in mind that the book of Jeremiah is primarily prophecy. Jeremiah is a prophet of doom. Why did he prophesies the destruction of Jerusalem? Because the Israelites interrmarried God's Truth with the lie of fulfilling the flesh.

Just as with other prophecies, this was written for our time, to our people, and referring to the common customs of the modern world. Why is this important? Because it points to the end of all things.

the deadly 7

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Re: Book of Jeremiah 10:2
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2009, 05:52:12 AM »
My New American Catholic Bible translates jrd into customs:

What is the Christian Bible equivalent for 'way'?

Matt 7:13 (Jesus said)
"Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it."

The original Greek word for way is hodos.

according to searchgodsword.org:

way can mean:

1. properly
1. a way
1. a travelled way, road
2. a travellers way, journey, travelling
2. metaph.
1. a course of conduct
2. a way (i.e. manner) of thinking, feeling, deciding


Even though Jer. 10:1-4 no doubt had an application to the customs practiced some 2600 years ago, we must keep in mind that the book of Jeremiah is primarily prophecy. Jeremiah is a prophet of doom. Why did he prophesies the destruction of Jerusalem? Because the Israelites interrmarried God's Truth with the lie of fulfilling the flesh.

Just as with other prophecies, this was written for our time, to our people, and referring to the common customs of the modern world. Why is this important? Because it points to the end of all things.

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Re: Book of Jeremiah 10:2
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2010, 04:47:21 PM »
Grove
(See ASHTORETH.) Translated rather "Asherah," the image of the goddess. So 2 Kings 23:6, where it is nonsense "Josiah brought out the grove (Asherah) from the house of the Lord"; Manasseh had "set this graven image of Asherah in the house" (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 22:7; compare Judges 3:7). Also a "grove" could not be "set up under every green tree" (2 Kings 17:10; 1 Kings 14:23; 1 Kings 18:19; Exodus 34:13). In Genesis 21:33 it is a different word, "Abraham planted a "grove" (eshowl) in Beersheba," rather "a tamarisk tree," a hardy evergreen fitted to be a memorial to his posterity that the well was theirs.
The Asherah was upright, fixed or planted in the ground; of wood, so that it was capable of being "cut down and burned" (Judges 6:25-26; see 1 Kings 15:13). "Maacbah had made an idol Asherah" (not" IN grove".) The worship of Asherah like that of Astarte or Ashtoreth, was associated with Baal worship. Astarte is the personal goddess, Ashcrah her conventional symbol in some one of her attributes. The sacred tree in Assyrian sculptures is similar, a symbol of the goddess of nature. The stone "pillar" (as the Hebrew for "image" ought to be translated, Exodus 34:13) was Baal's symbol; as the wooden pillar or tree was Astarte's (2 Kings 18:4).
The attempt to combine this with Jehovah worship is the subject of the prohibition (Exodus 34:13). The Hebrew word translated "plain" (elon) signifies a grove or plantation; that of Mamre (Genesis 13:18), of Moreh (Genesis 12:6), of Zaanaim (Judges 4:11), of the pillar in Shechem (Judges 9:6), of Meonenim (Judges 9:37), of Tabor (1 Samuel 10:3). Groves were associated with worship from ancient times, as the passages just quoted show. Pliny states that trees were the first temples. Their shade, solitude, and solemn stillness suggested this use. The superstitious abuse of them to idolatry and licentious rites caused the Divine prohibition of them for religious purposes; which prohibition Israel disregarded (Jeremiah 17:2; Ezekiel 20:28).
Trees were also used for national assemblies (Judges 9:6; Judges 9:37), for burying the dead (Genesis 35:8; 1 Samuel 31:14). Some trees are specially-noted: the tamarisk (eeshel) under which Saul abode in Gibeah (1 Samuel 22:6); the terebinth in Shechem under which Joshua, after writing the law of God, set up (Joshua 24:26) a great stone as a witness; the palm tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5); the terebinth of enchantments (Judges 9:37 margin, frontMEONENIM); of wanderers (Judges 6:11, frontZAANAIM)); 1 Samuel 14:2, "a pomegranate tree in Migron" (1 Samuel 10:3).
Tree worship, perhaps a distortion of the tradition of the tree of life and the tree of knowledge (Genesis 3), may be traced in Egypt, Arabia, Syria, Assyria, Persia, India, Thibet, Siam, China, Japan, Ceylon, the Philippine isles. The Druids venerated oak groves (Pliny, H. N., xvi. 44; Tacitus, Annals xiv. 30). The black priests in Africa alone may enter the sacred groves. The Etrurians worshipped a palm-tree.

Bibliography Information
Fausset, Andrew Robert M.A., D.D., "Definition for 'Grove' Fausset's Bible Dictionary".